When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem
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When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem

David Romano’s lovely When Tomorrow Starts Without Me poem gives a look into the afterlife through the eyes of the departed.

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem

The lyrics of this lovely poem are engraved on a number of compassion gifts. We hope that this poem will be able to bring peace and comfort to the bereaved.

Romano delves into issues of love, death, and loss in ‘When Tomorrow Begins Without Me.’ The poet produces a monologue via a vision of the Christian afterlife that explains a speaker’s death, and his place with God, and attempts to comfort all those who have lost someone.

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me

By: David M Romano

When tomorrow starts without me

And I’m not here to see

If the sun should rise and find your eyes

All filled with tears for me

 

I wish you wouldn’t cry

The Way you did today

While thinking of the many things

We did not get to say

 

I know how much you love me

As much as I love you

Each time that you think of me

I know you will miss me too

 

When tomorrow starts with out me

Please try to understand

That an angel came and called my name

And took me by the hand

 

The angel said my place was ready

In heaven far above

And That I would have to leave behind

All those I Dearly Love

 

But When I walked through Heaven’s Gates

I felt so much at home

When GOD looked down and smiled at me

From his golden throne

 

He said This Is Eternity

And All I promised you

Today for life on earth is done

But Here it starts a new

 

I promise no tomorrow

For today will always last

And Since each day’s the exact same way

There is no longing for the past

 

So When Tomorrow starts without me

Do not think we’re apart

For every time you think of me

Remember I’m right here in your heart

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Summary and Analysis of When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem

Stanzas One and Two

When tomorrow starts without me

(…)

We did not get to say

The speaker opens the first two stanzas by using the sentence that would eventually become the poem’s title. He is looking forward and addressing a period when he will no longer be living. It will be the day “tomorrow begins without me.” This statement is quickly followed by three others that set the scene. The day will begin, and he will have no idea if “you” are sobbing.

The person he is chatting with adores him, but he never reveals their identity. This is one of the reasons why the poem has become so famous; it is applicable to a wide range of relationships and sorts of loss.

In the second stanza, Romano uses enjambment to move between lines. His speaker wishes that this individual does not cry for him “as you did today.” They should not have any regrets.

Stanzas Three and Four

I know how much you love me

(…)

And took me by the hand

The speaker recognizes the affection he shares with the listener and the reality that he will be missed in the next verse of ‘When Tomorrow Starts Without Me.’ The word “love” appears twice in this verse and multiple times throughout the poem.

The speaker attempts to assuage the speaker’s impending absence by claiming that he was taken “by the hand” by an angel and carried up to paradise. This notion should provide some comfort to the listener.

Because of the highly regular rhyme system in these lines, every rhyme is flawless. This makes sense given the topic matter and the tone the poet wishes to convey.

When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem

Stanzas Five and Six

The angel said my place was ready

(…)

From his golden throne

The next lines continue to employ an allusion approach to refer to something obliquely, without revealing all the specifics or addressing it by name. In this situation, he’s talking about death and the afterlife without saying anything. In this portion, he narrates what he believes the angel will say to him in order to calm the listener.

The sixth stanza cements the peaceful/calm feeling that Romano worked hard to achieve in this poem. Words like “smiled,” “golden,” and “home” are used to let the reader feel the same warmth as the speaker.

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Stanzas Seven, Eight, and Nine

He said This Is Eternity

And All I promised you

(…)

For every time you think of me

Remember I’m right here in your heart

God speaks to the recently deceased speaker, telling him that “life on earth is done / But here it starts a new”. He is entering into a new world that will supply him with infinite happiness, and that should make the listener happy too.

The speaker summarizes all of the statements he made about his life and death in the preceding seven quatrains in the last stanzas. He can’t guarantee “you” “tomorrow,” and he won’t be there forever.

Again, he says there’s no need to be sad since he’ll be “right here in your heart.” The final stanza repeats the conclusion “me” two more times, completing the six epistrophe occurrences strewn throughout the poem.

Form and Structure

‘When Tomorrow Starts Without Me,’ by David M. Romano, is a nine-stanza poem divided into four-line groups known as quatrains. These quatrains use an ABCB rhyme system, with different end sounds from stanza to stanza.

Romano opted to include additional end rhymes in a couple of portions of the poem. Lines one, two, and four of stanza one, for example, all rhyme.

An attentive reader may also notice examples of internal rhymes, or rhymes that occur within the lines but not at the endings. For example, in line three of the first stanza, “rise” and “eyes” or “way” and “today” in line two of the second stanza.

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Analysis of Literary Devices in ‘When Tomorrow Starts Without Me’

In ‘When Tomorrow Starts Without Me Poem,’ Romano employs a number of lyrical devices. Epistrophe, allusion, enjambment, and alliteration are examples of these.

1. Alliteration

When words are used in succession, or at least appear near together, and begin with the same sound, this is called a reversal. For example, in line three of the fourth stanza, “came” and “called,” and in line one of the sixth stanza, “when” and “walked.”

2. Epistrophe

This is the use of the same word or phrase at the conclusion of several lines or phrases. Romano utilizes similar words throughout ‘When Tomorrow Starts Without Me.’ Many of these words appear several times. An attentive reader will notice the word “me” at the end of six lines.

3. Enjambment

It happens when a line is severed before it reaches its natural endpoint. Enjambment pushes a reader to swiftly move on to the next line, then the next. To easily resolve a phrase or sentence, one must go on. Consider the transitions between lines 2 and 3 of the first stanza and lines 1 and 2 of the sixth.

4. Allusion

This is a term used to invoke a certain thought without simply saying it. At the center of this essay, there is a good example of an allusion. Although the speaker never speaks the terms “death” or “dying” in the text, a reader will understand what he’s referring to.

The fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh stanzas all address death, ascension to Heaven, and other aspects of the afterlife.

We hope this article on when tomorrow starts without me poem has been interesting. Please endeavor to share this article with family, friends, and colleagues. Cheers.

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