Poems About Humanity
|

Poems About Humanity (A Collection of Lovely Poems)

By linking us to individuals who have strived to do the same, great poems about humanity might aid us in better clarifying and comprehending our own experiences.

Poems About Humanity

Poems About Humanity

From the time of the ancients till the present, poetry has been one of the most popular forms of this expression. These phrases have the power to express both the impersonal feelings and the specific experiences that have made up our humanity throughout the years.

These excellent and well-known modern and ancient poets wrote some of the most well-known poems about humanity.

These samples demonstrate the structure, organization, and style of well-known poems about humanity.

1. Humanity Poem by Tareq Jalabi

i`m like the undead
shaking my head
all my life
having no drive
i`ve lost faith in humanity

coz humans live a tragedy
and the ones with big bucks
keep them in a hundred locks
while humans are dying
fishes they are frying
drinking ancient wine
while others are drying
what happened to hearts
are they now rock

In the best senario
and with a bit of luck
you will find no mercy
and nothing but a block

2. Beautiful City by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Beautiful city, the centre and crater of European confusion,

O you with your passionate shriek for the rights of an equal

humanity,

How often your Re-volution has proven but E-volution

Roll’d again back on itself in the tides of a civic insanity!

READ ALSO!!!

3. Daily Life by Susan Wood

A parrot of irritation sits

on my shoulder, pecks

at my head, ruffling his feathers

in my ear. He repeats

everything I say, like a child

trying to irritate the parent.

Too much to do today: the dracena

that’s outgrown its pot, a mountain

of bills to pay and nothing in the house

to eat. Too many clothes need washing

and the dog needs his shots.

It just goes on and on, I say

to myself, no one around, and catch

myself saying it, a ball hit so straight

to your glove you’d have to be

blind not to catch it. And of course

I hope it does go on and on

forever, the little pain,

the little pleasure, the sun

a blood orange in the sky, the sky

parrot blue and the day

unfolding like a bird slowly

spreading its wings, though I know,

saying it, that it won’t.

4. Difficult Body by Mark Wunderlich

A story: There was a cow in the road, struck by a semi–
half-moon of carcass and jutting legs, eyes
already milky with dust and snow, rolled upward

as if tired of this world tilted on its side.
We drove through the pink light of the police cruiser,
her broken flank blowing steam in the air.

Minutes later, a deer sprang onto the road
and we hit her, crushed her pelvis–the drama reversed,
first consequence, then action–but the doe,

not dead, pulled herself with front legs
into the ditch. My father went to her, stunned her
with a tire iron before cutting her throat, and today I think

of the body of St. Francis in the Arizona desert,
carved from wood and laid in his casket,
lovingly dressed in red and white satin

covered in petitions–medals, locks of hair,
photos of infants, his head lifted and stroked,
the grain of his brow kissed by the penitent.

O wooden saint, dry body. I will not be like you,
carapace. A chalky shell scooped of its life.
I will leave less than this behind me.

READ ALSO!!!

5. Elegy in Joy [excerpt] by Muriel Rukeyser

We tell beginnings: for the flesh and the answer,
or the look, the lake in the eye that knows,
for the despair that flows down in widest rivers,
cloud of home; and also the green tree of grace,
all in the leaf, in the love that gives us ourselves.

The word of nourishment passes through the women,
soldiers and orchards rooted in constellations,
white towers, eyes of children:
saying in time of war What shall we feed?
I cannot say the end.

Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings.
Not all things are blest, but the
seeds of all things are blest.
The blessing is in the seed.

This moment, this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love.
Years over wars and an imagining of peace. Or the expiation journey
toward peace which is many wishes flaming together,
fierce pure life, the many-living home.
Love that gives us ourselves, in the world known to all
new techniques for the healing of the wound,
and the unknown world. One life, or the faring stars.

6. First Things to Hand by Robert Pinsky

In the skull kept on the desk.
In the spider-pod in the dust.

Or nowhere. In milkmaids, in loaves,
Or nowhere. And if Socrates leaves

His house in the morning,
When he returns in the evening

He will find Socrates waiting
On the doorstep. Buddha the stick

You use to clear the path,
And Buddha the dog-doo you flick

Away with it, nowhere or in each
Several thing you touch:

The dollar bill, the button
That works the television.

Even in the joke, the three
Words American men say

After making love. Where’s
The remote? In the tears

In things, proximate, intimate.
In the wired stem with root

And leaf nowhere of this lamp:
Brass base, aura of illumination,

Enlightenment, shade of grief.
Odor of the lamp, brazen.

The mind waiting in the mind
As in the first thing to hand.

READ ALSO!!!

7. Insomnia by Alicia Ostriker

But it’s really fear you want to talk about
and cannot find the words
so you jeer at yourself

you call yourself a coward
you wake at 2 a.m. thinking failure,
fool, unable to sleep, unable to sleep

buzzing away on your mattress with two pillows
and a quilt, they call them comforters,
which implies that comfort can be bought

and paid for, to help with the fear, the failure
your two walnut chests of drawers snicker, the bookshelves mourn
the art on the walls pities you, the man himself beside you

asleep smelling like mushrooms and moss is a comfort
but never enough, never, the ceiling fixture lightless
velvet drapes hiding the window

traffic noise like a vicious animal
on the loose somewhere out there—
you brag to friends you won’t mind death only dying

what a liar you are—
all the other fears, of rejection, of physical pain,
of losing your mind, of losing your eyes,

they are all part of this!
Pawprints of this! Hair snarls in your comb
this glowing clock the single light in the room

There is no other way to say things; they are what they are. This collection of poems about humanity reflects, honors, and criticizes all individuals who were adversely affected by the awful pandemic that we had to endure.

Did you enjoy reading Poems About Memories? If you found this article useful, endeavor to share this article using the really simple share icons to share on Twitter or Facebook.

Daily Time Poems.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.