10 Mexican Superheroes to Brighten Your Mexican Independence Day

Do you want to learn more about the Mexican superhero? The Marvel Universe is always expanding with thrilling new Hispanic heroes. We shall cover some of Mexico’s indigenous heroes in this post.

mexican superhero

As comics grow more diversified, Mexican superheroes are becoming more prevalent.

Mexico ultimately achieved independence from Spanish rule and celebrate its anniversary on September 16.

Since I believe that everyone reading this article is a book nerd and may be interested in the subject being discussed today.

I thought it would be fun to talk about some literary Mexicans and Mexican Americans.

Mexican comics culture is not at all a recent development. Its origins may be seen in several periods of Mexican history.

Political satire has persisted in modern Mexican comics, and there have been some attempts by new independent comics like Zeraky, El Bulbo, Caballo Negro, El Arsenal, and Karmatron.

Mexicans in My Comics? What Do You Think?

Mexicans and Latinos in general have always been underrepresented in American comic books. When we did, we frequently played villains—and really ridiculous ones at that.

With the re-importation of American heroes comics as well as certain domestic titles like Ultrapato, Tinieblas, Son of the Night, and Penumbra in the 1990s, the Mexican comics industry started to flourish once more.

Similar to Pancho and Pepita from the worst Wonder Woman comic, the character calls himself “the Parrot.”

Every now and again, a Latino would get to be the victim of racism so that the white heroes could save us, celebrate their virtue and enlightenment, and then return to ignoring their girlfriends and beating up South American indigenous and Asian communists.

Every now and again, a Latino would get to be the victim of racism so that the white heroes could save us, celebrating their virtue and enlightenment, and then return to ignoring their spouses and beating up South American indigenous and Asian communists.

Zorro made his pulp magazine debut in 1919 and went on the lam in Mexico-era California, guarding the underprivileged against the corrupt upper classes.

The Mark of Zorro is sometimes cited as the film Bruce Wayne’s parents took him to watch right before they were killed since he is the widely accepted basis for the superhero archetype, most notably Batman.

Emilio Diaz, a gunslinger who appeared as a supporting character in the obscure 1950s series Texas Kid, is the first illustration of a Mexican comic book hero I could discover before Zorro.

Vivan Los Héroes 

Superheroes from Mexico and Mexican Americans have gained popularity in recent years. Well, the word “proliferated” is strong.

But compared to before, there is a lot more. Here are some at the moment.

Spider-girl

Spider-girl

Anya Corazon is a Latina superhero in comic books. In Mexican comic comics, she appears as the superheroine. She is widely known by her nickname spider girl.

Anya Corazon, often known as Araña (“Spider”), immigrated to the United States from Mexico when she was a little kid. Later, she joined a secret group and developed spider-like abilities.

In 2005, she even played the lead role in her own comic book series, Araña: The Heart of the Spider.

Anya eventually lost her spider abilities, got new ones, and is now friends with some of Marvel’s biggest stars, including S.H.I.E.L.D. She is actually living out the American dream.

Spider-Man 2099

Spider-Man 2099

A made-up superhero named Spider-Man 2099 may be found in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

In the not-too-distant future, on Earth-928, the world brutally disintegrated and is now ruled by corporations and oligarchs. 

To combat these horrors, new heroes appeared in the year 2099.

Miguel O’Hara is a bright scientist who, in spite of malicious intervention, grants himself spider powers and transforms into the new Spider-Man.

Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner)

Kyle Rayner is a senior Green Lantern Corps member from Earth.

He was chosen to wear the final power ring and continue the title after the rest of the Corps was wiped out.

After his most well-known predecessor, Hal Jordan, was infected by a space virus and killed the rest of the Corps, Kyle took over the role and ring, ushering in a new period in Green Lantern history.

Kyle is Mexican American thanks to the limitless inherent to superhero comics. In order to operate secretly for the CIA, Gabriel Vasquez adopted the identity of Aaron Rayner.

Green Lantern (Jessica Cruz)

mexican superhero

Jessica Cruz, one of the Green Lantern characters, is a superheroine who appears in American comic books produced by DC Comics.

She was created by Geoff Johns, Doug Mahnke, Ivan Reis, and Ethan Van Sciver and is a Green Lantern Corps and Justice League member.

After witnessing mobsters kill her friends, Jessica Cruz had anxiety and PTSD.

However, thanks to some encouraging words from Batman, she overcame her worries and joined the Green Lantern Corps. Even though she still battles mental illness, she is still a hero.

Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes)

Blue Beetle (Jaime Reyes)

A made-up superhero named Jaime Reyes may be found in American comic books published by DC Comics.

A superheroine who appears in American comic books published by DC Comics is Jessica Cruz, one of the characters known as Green Lantern.

She is a member of the Green Lantern Corps and the Justice League and was created by Geoff Johns, Doug Mahnke, Ivan Reis, and Ethan Van Sciver.

Following the murder of her companions by mobsters, Jessica Cruz had anxiety and PTSD.

However, thanks to some encouraging words from Batman (not a typo), she overcame her worries and joined the Green Lantern Corps.

She still battles mental illness, but that doesn’t diminish her status as a hero.

Rictor

mexican superhero

Rictor is a made-up superhero who predominantly appears in the X-Men series of American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Julio Esteban Richter began hanging around with various X-teams after acquiring the mutant ability to cause earthquakes. There are a lot of X-teams.

He began a long-term relationship with Shatterstar after meeting her while he was a member of X-Force.

Justicia

Only two issues of Suicide Squad Most Wanted in 2017 have featured this team of Mexican criminal fighters.

However, in all honesty, I believe that the world right now needs more Mexican heroes, so I really hope that DC uses these characters at some point in the near future—preferably as anything other than cannon fodder.

Reptil

mexican superhero

The best superpower ever belongs to Humberto Lopez, an exalted enthusiast who can give himself dinosaur body parts (Raptor claws! Tyrannosaurus tail!).

As a regular on the horribly underappreciated animated series The Super Hero Squad Show, Reptil originally gained notoriety.

Wildcat

mexican superhero

Ted Grant, a boxer who also happens to be the protagonist Wildcat, is the godfather of Yolanda Montez.

Yolanda adopted Ted’s identity and clothing after he died tragically in war to preserve his memory.

She was murdered in 1993 by the villain Eclipso, but following the 2011 New 52 reboot, she made a triumphant comeback as the Avatar of the Red, with the power to connect with the energy that underlies all animal life.

Bunker

Miguel Jose Barragan, a jovial young man from a rural village, joins the Teen Titans in 2011 as Bunker.

He has the capacity to transform purple energy into bricks. (So, yeah, if he wanted to, he could build a wall, but he chooses to create enormous gloves to punch the kinds of people who would recommend he build walls.)

He has a lover called Gabriel and is openly homosexual. DC hasn’t done anything with this character recently, which is a shame.

Al Rescate

Mexicans and Mexican Americans are stereotyped as being victims and villains, much like in those old comics.

You could “know” that it’s more nuanced than that, but how frequently is that reality depicted on television or in books?

Being Mexican American is pretty difficult right now, so I’m clinging to every ray of hope I can find.

Superheroes from Mexico are one. Even while it can’t solve every problem, effective representation is sometimes all you need to get through the day.

Keep in mind that Mexicans are also people, not simply villains, victims, or even heroes. And just like everyone else, people enjoy stories and finding themselves in them.

You may find more intriguing novels on our page. This is the ideal page for you if you enjoy reading.

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